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Hillary Clinton Leads Delegate Count, But There Is Time

With his victory in the Maine caucuses, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders has now won in eight of the 19 states that have voted in the Democratic presidential race. He is trailing former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton in delegates and the number of contests won, but he and his campaign have repeatedly asserted that they are still in good shape to bring together a winning coalition before the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia in July. But is that true?

The simple answer to that question is, yes, Sanders could still, at least in theory, win the Democratic nomination. The more complicated answer to that question — and one that is a bit more common to hear from 2016 presidential pundits — is that the path ahead doesn’t look great for the senator.

With his big win in the Maine caucuses Sunday, Sanders brings his total number of delegates (including superdelegates) up to 499. That’s far behind Clinton’s count of 1,130, which also includes superdelegates. Candidates need 2,383 delegates to win the nomination, and 3,136 are yet to be chosen.

“We are having a very, very good weekend,” Sanders said Saturday after winning in the Kansas and Nebraska contests. “We think we have a lot of momentum behind us as we continue forward.”

That there are 31 states left to vote certainly shows the race is far from over. Unlike the Republicans, the Democrats award their delegates on a proportional basis throughout the nominating season. It’s not at all clear that Sanders will be able to make up for some of his campaign’s perceived weaknesses at this point — including a notable lack of enthusiasm for his candidacy among black and Hispanic voters — but he theoretically still has time and is said to be expecting strong showings in big states down the line like New York and California, as well as Washington and Oregon.

Superdelegates could be the wild card. Unlike pledged delegates awarded by votes in primaries and caucuses, the superdelegates are party leaders and elected officials and can change their support at will. If Sanders does pick up enough momentum to make the race tight, the two candidates could find themselves headed into the July convention with those decisive delegate votes out of their control.

So far the Republicans’ organized punch-out of Donald Trump doesn’t seem to be working, but we won’t know for sure until 10 days from now when GOP voters in Florida and Ohio go to the polls.

Despite two hard-hitting debates and a strong denunciation of Trump by Mitt Romney, the last Republican presidential candidate, voters are even more convinced that the billionaire businessman will be this year’s GOP nominee.

Right now, that’s not good news for Republicans. Democrat Hillary Clinton has moved to a five-point lead over Trump in a hypothetical presidential matchup. The two were tied in late December.

Still, Democrats will find it a lot harder to pigeonhole Trump as the typical social conservative Republican, and that, along with unhappiness with Clinton, may make this race a lot more competitive than many originally predicted.

More Democrats than ever now support Clinton’s bid for their party’s presidential nomination following her big win in the South Carolina primary.

This week’s bad news for Clinton is that the U.S. Justice Department reportedly has granted immunity from prosecution to a former State Department employee who worked on her private e-mail server. Most voters still believe it’s likely Clinton broke the law by sending and receiving classified information through the server while she was secretary of State.

Trump and Clinton may be the presidential front-runners in their respective parties, but right now there are more voters who say they will vote against them than will vote for them.

One-in-five Republican (19%) and unaffiliated voters (20%) say they’ve switched their support to another candidate as a result of the presidential debates, compared to just 11% of Democrats.

All four candidates at Thursday night’s GOP debate swore to support the party’s eventual nominee. Over a third (36%) of GOP voters said last summer that they are likely to vote for Trump if he’s a third-party candidate, and that was before the surge in support Trump has experienced in recent months.

But win or lose, Trump is doing the GOP a favor by making it potentially a less ideological party and one that is more attractive to a wider spectrum of voters.

Senate Republican leaders made it clear to President Obama this week that they will not consider any nomination he makes to fill the U.S. Supreme Court seat vacated by the death of Justice Antonin Scalia. Nearly half (48%) of Republicans say they’d be more likely to vote for a senator who refuses to consider an Obama nominee, but slightly more Democrats (50%) say they’d be less likely to vote for that candidate.

In the thick of primary season, most voters still think their fellow Americans need to prove their identity before voting and don’t believe photo ID laws discriminate against some voters.

Six years after its passage by Congress, Obama's national health care law remains unpopular with a majority of voters who still believe it will lead to higher costs and lower the quality of care.

Reducing costs remains voters' top health care priority, and they continue to believe that keeping government out of the health care market is the best way to achieve that goal.

Most Americans think the public outcry over the ongoing water contamination crisis in Flint, Michigan, by prominent officials like Clinton and the president is more about politics than a solution to the problem.

In other surveys last week:

-- Twenty-nine percent (29%) of voters think the country is heading in the right direction.

-- Our latest Consumer Spending Monitor suggests that consumers have some spring home improvement projects in mind.

-- Forty-nine percent (49%) of voters approved of Obama’s job performance in February, up one point from January and matching the highest finding in all of last year.

-- The president’s daily job approval rating rose to -5 earlier this week, the highest it’s been in nearly three years.

-- Americans don't consider their fellow countrymen an overly honest group, but they think most play fair when it comes to their taxes. They’re also less worried this year about being audited by the IRS.

The full Senate has given approval to a measure allowing Oklahomans to decide whether to modernize state laws on beer and wine sales. Senate Joint Resolution 68, by Sen. Clark Jolley and co-authored by Sen. Stephanie Bice, would let voters make the constitutional changes necessary to allow the sale of wine and strong beer in grocery stores.

“This is the culmination of months of meetings with all the stakeholders. We’ve had a lot of hard conversations with everyone involved,” said Jolley, R-Edmond. “The very nature of most complex issues is that no one person or entity will get everything exactly the way they want it. But Oklahomans from across the state are frustrated with outdated laws on beer and wine sales. Our goal is to make sure it is a comprehensive approach, addressing the changes needed in both the constitution and in the statutes.”

Senate President Pro Tempore Brian Bingman is also a co-author of SJR 68.

“This bill gives Oklahomans what they have sought for years: the opportunity to modernize our state’s alcohol laws and bring us in line with practically all other states. If approved by the voters, this measure introduces more options and choice for consumers and will spur growth and economic development in the industry. I appreciate Senators Jolley and Bice for their determined work in guiding this measure through the process.”

While SJR 68 would allow voters to make the constitutional changes necessary, Sen. Stephanie Bice is principal author of Senate Bill 383, co-authored by Jolley, which would make the statutory changes needed to modernize Oklahoma laws on beer and wine sales.

“Compromise does not come easily, but Oklahoma citizens have spoken loud and clear. They’re tired of living under laws they see as a throw-back to prohibition, something that ended in our state nearly 57 years ago—they want the same consumer choices people in most other states already enjoy,” said Bice, R- Oklahoma City. “Combined, SJR 68 and SB 383 will help us thoroughly address all the changes necessary to make sure that happens.”

SJR 68 now moves to the House of Representatives for further consideration.

Voters who want to vote early for the March 1st, Presidential Preferential Primary can do so at the County Election Board office on Thursday, Friday, or Saturday, February 25th through 27th. A two-member, bipartisan Absentee Voting Board will be on duty Thursday and Friday from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. and Saturday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. to assist voters.

Registered voters have until Wednesday, February 24th to apply for an Absentee Ballot. They may do so in person at the County Election Board office or complete an Absentee Application online at the Oklahoma State Board website. The application can also be downloaded from the Oklahoma State Election Board website. You may send in the Absentee Application by mail, fax or email.

The Oklahoma Democratic Party is now allowing registered Independents (No Party) to vote in their primary elections for the calendar years of 2016 and 2017. All Independent voters now have the option to vote a Democratic ballot. Independents may request ONLY a Democratic ballot at their polling place if interested in voting in the primary.

VOTING LOCATION MOVED Voters who vote at the OSU Student Union building, Precinct 560009, will voter at the Covelle Hall, the old daycare building across the street from OUS Student Union parking lot for the March 1st election. The Election Board will have signs out directing the voters to the new voting location

The State Election Board has a very helpful tool at their website which allows voters to verify their party affiliation, locate their polling location, track their absentee ballot, find early voting dates/hours, sample ballots and view election night results. The link for the State’s website is www.ok.gov/elections.

Sample ballots of the Democratic and Republican Presidential Primary race are available at the election board office for voters to pick up. Voters can also request sample ballots via email or fax.

Voters who have questions can come by the election board office, 1st floor, room 102 in the Okmulgee County Courthouse, 314 W 7th or contact us by phone at 918-756-2365 or by email at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Okmulgee County Election Board Secretary Ashley Carnes reported the official tallies of Okmulgee County votes from the recent Municipal Election last Tuesday Feb 6.

They are as follows:


BEGGS PUBLIC SCHOOLS INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 004
FOR OFFICE NO. 1 BEGGS PUBLIC SCHOOLS
Precinct OG CORKY THOMPSON LEONARD MOORE, Jr.

OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560020 13 107
OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560029 2 14
OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560031 3 9
OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560032 0 2
OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560033 0 0
Total: 18 132

CHECOTAH PUBLIC SCHOOLS INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 019
FOR OFFICE NO. 1 CHECOTAH PUBLIC SCHOOLS
Precinct CHRIS BROWN BO CHANDLER

OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560018 08 0
Total: 0 0

CITY OF OKMULGEE
FOR COUNCIL MEMBER AT LARGE CITY OF OKMULGEE
Precinct STEVEN R. BALDRIDGE TERRY WATKINS ERIC L. CHAPMAN
OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560001 26 13 3
OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560002 45 44 2
OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560004 5 1 0
OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560005 48 16 7
OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560006 26 12 4
OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560007 31 32 4
OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560008 19 15 6
OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560009 36 8 4
OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560010 23 7 1
OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560011 61 28 13
OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560012 165 32 8
OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560031 0 0 0
OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560032 3 5 0
OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560036 3 2 0
Total: 491 215 52

DEWAR PUBLIC SCHOOLS INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 008
PROPOSITION NO. 1 DEWAR PUBLIC SCHOOLS
Precinct FOR THE PROPOSITION – YES FOR THE PROPOSITION – NO

MCINTOSH COUNTY PCT 460313 20 0
OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560013 43 11
OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560021 15 2
OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560035 0 0
Total: 78 13

PROPOSITION NO. 2 DEWAR PUBLIC SCHOOLS
Precinct FOR THE PROPOSITION – YES FOR THE PROPOSITION – NO

MCINTOSH COUNTY PCT 460313 20 0
OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560013 43 11
OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560021 14 3
OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560035 0 0
Total: 77 14

INDIAN CAPITAL TECH CENTER DISTRICT NO. 4
FOR OFFICE NO. 1 INDIAN CAPITAL TECH CENTER
Precinct DARRELL RUSSELL EDWYNA WARRIOR WALKER

OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560018 0 0
OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560026 0 0
OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560027 0 0
Total: 0 0

MORRIS PUBLIC SCHOOLS INDIEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 003
FOR OFFICE NO. 1 MORRIS PUBLIC SCHOOLS
Precinct JAMES ALLRED BOBBY HOWELL DONNA PAYNE KYLE BROOKS

OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560012 12 9 2 14
OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560021 27 1 1 15
OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560026 74 7 36 76
OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560027 0 0 0 0
OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560034 14 0 1 7
OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560036 48 4 13 27
Total: 175 21 53 139

WELEETKA PUBLIC SCHOOLS INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 031
PROPOSITION WELEEKA PUBLIC SCHOOLSPrecinct FOR THE PROPOSITION – YES FOR THE PROPOSITION – NO

OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560016 0 0
Total: 0 0

WILSON PUBLIC SCHOOLS INDEPENDENT SCHOOL DISTRICT NO. 007
PROPOSITION WILSON PUBLIC SCHOOLSPrecinct FOR THE PROPOSITION – YES FOR THE PROPOSITION – NO

OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560010 1 2
OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560015 0 1
OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560019 0 0
OKMULGEE COUNTY PCT 560038 85 18
Total: 86 21

HENRYETTA CHAMBER OF COMMERCE SPONSORED
2016 LEGISLATIVE FORUM SCHEDULE
YOU’RE INVITED – STAY INFORMED

The Henryetta Chamber of Commerce has scheduled the last Friday of January, February, March, and April for the 2016 Legislative Forums. The forums will be held at the Cowboy Corner located at I-40 Exit 237. The forums will begin at noon. Hopefully this noon schedule will allow for expanded attendance for these very informative meetings with your legislators.

The Legislative Forums are designed to offer an opportunity for constituents to hear directly from their elected representatives regarding the details of various legislative efforts that may affect our area, the State of Oklahoma, and the nation. The Forum also offers a chance to meet one-on-one with your elected representative and to voice your input on the issues being addressed during the current session.

After our regular order of business, the county commissioners had the following agenda items:

The Board approved the Steel Beam Transfer Form with the Oklahoma Department of Transportation to allow beams that have been declared surplus property to be reused by Okmulgee County.

The Board approved the Memorandum of Understanding with the Oklahoma Department of Transportation to help assure that critical bridge findings, load postings and bridge closing recommendations are addressed in a timely manner,

That concluded the business for Feb. 1, 2016.

The Precinct meetings for the Okmulgee County Republicans will be held on Tuesday night, February 9, 2016. The Precinct meetings will begin at 7 pm at the Student Union building on the campus of Oklahoma State University Institute of Technology in the conference room in Okmulgee, OK.

Precinct meetings are an opportunity for every registered Republican to participate first hand in grassroots politics. These meetings are open to all registered Republicans in the precinct, and we encourage all Republicans to participate. In Oklahoma, attending a precinct meeting is the first step in the election of delegates to the Oklahoma Republican State Convention to be held in Moore, OK, on Saturday May, 14, 2016.
For more information, please contact Okmulgee County Chair Marsheila Prior at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

January 02, 2016 - Hope is dwindling, and a desire for change is in the air.

Just 26% of voters think the country is headed in the right direction.

In the weeks since mid-September, the number of voters who feel the country is heading in the right direction has been at the 24% to 26% level more than half the time – at or near the low for the year.

More than a third of Americans say they are in worse financial shape than they were last year at this time, and most of them expect to be even worse off 12 months from now.

As President Obama enters his final year as president, voters are more critical than ever of his leadership abilities. His daily job approval ratings, meanwhile, remain in the mid- to high negative teens.

But voters including members of their own party aren’t pleased with the Republicans’ control of both chambers of Congress this past year either. No wonder then that GOP voters are gravitating toward outsider candidates like Donald Trump in the race for the Republican presidential nomination.

Trump gained early traction with his call for a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border and for deporting illegal immigrants. Most voters continue to believe the government isn’t cracking down enough on illegal immigration and still take issue with a central provision in Obama’s plan to exempt up to five million illegals from deportation.

That’s no surprise since most voters still oppose the president’s amnesty plan.

Voters think the media is more biased against Trump than Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton. Perhaps nowhere is that more apparent than in the media coverage of their views on immigration.

Clinton vowed earlier this month to unleash her husband, former President Bill Clinton, on the campaign trail on her behalf in January, but that’s looking less like a good idea. When she recently criticized Trump as “a sexist,” he countered by saying she had long been protecting a sexual abuser, referring to her husband’s history of extramarital affairs including one with White House intern Monica Lewinsky which led to his impeachment. The media has been full of that back-and-forth for several days since our poll was taken.

Trump and Clinton remain all tied up in a hypothetical presidential matchup.

After months of allegations, legendary comedian Bill Cosby has been formally charged with sexual assault. By last summer, Americans already had a much more negative view of Cosby but stopped short of calling for his Presidential Medal of Freedom to be revoked.

Most working Americans still get major holidays off, especially if they work for the government.

Americans have long believed that government workers work less hard but earn more pay and have more job security than those in the private sector.

But Americans used the U.S. Postal Service more this holiday season compared to recent years.

In other surveys last week:

-- Most Americans planned to greet 2016 with a kiss.

-- Most aren’t starting off the new year with a resolution, but those who are plan to stick with it.

-- Christmas remains the top holiday on Americans’ calendar, while New Year’s Day still falls a lot farther down the list.

Subscribers to Rasmussen Reports receive exclusive stories each week for less than a dollar a week. Please sign up now. Visit the Rasmussen Reports home page for the latest current polling coverage of events in the news. The page is updated several times each day.

Remember, if it's in the news, it's in our polls.

Candidate filing for Okmulgee City Council Members and Okmulgee County School District Board Members closed on Dec. 9.

Those filing declarations of candidacy are:

OKMULGEE COUNTY ELECTION BOARD - CANDIDATE FILINGS
NAME DISTRICT OFFICE
Moore Jr., Leonard I. Beggs Public Schools - SD 100456 Board Member - Office No. 1
Thompson, Orvil Gene Beggs Public Schools - SD 100456 Board Member - Office No. 1
Baldridge, Steven L. City of Okmulgee -MU Okmulgee Council Member at Large
Watkins, Terry Bruce City of Okmulgee -MU Okmulgee Council Member at Large
Chapman, Eric Lynn City of Okmulgee -MU Okmulgee Council Member at Large
Carter, Nathan Eric Dewar Public Schools - SD 100856 Board Member - Office No. 1
Dykes Jr., David F. Green Country Tech Center - TC28 Board member - Office No. 4
Brown, Brandi Jean Henryetta Public Schools - SD 100256 Board Member - Office No. 1
Allred, James Morris Public Schools - SD 100356 Board Member - Office No. 1
Payne, Donna Delores Morris Public Schools - SD 100356 Board Member - Office No. 1
Brooks, El Kyle Morris Public Schools - SD 100356 Board Member - Office No. 1
Howell, Michael Robert Morris Public Schools - SD 100356 Board Member - Office No. 1
Jefferson, Kyamron Eugene Preston Public Schools - SD 100556 Board Member - Office No. 1
Rivera, John Torrres Schulter Public Schools - SD 100656 Board Member - Office No. 1
Costanza, Brian Mason Twin Hills Public Schools - SD C01156 Board Member - Office No. 3
Moore, Travis Keith Wilson Public Schools - SD 100756 Board Member - Office No. 1

The City of Okmulgee and Board of Education positions at stake will be filled at the non-partisan Regular Municipal and Annual School Elections scheduled Tuesday, February 9, 2016.

If no candidate receives more than 50% of the total votes cast in this election, the two candidates receiving the highest number of votes will meet in a run-off election on Tuesday, April 5, 2016.

ENTITY OFFICE TERM

City of Okmulgee Councilmembers at Large 3 Years

Beggs Public School Board Member Seat 1, 5 Years

Dewar Public School Board Members Seat 1, 5 Years

Seat 4 3 Years (unexpired)

Henryetta Public School Board Member Seat 1, 5 Years

Morris Public School Board Member Seat 1, 5 Years

Okmulgee Public School Board Member Seat 1, 5 Years

Preston Public School Board Member Seat 1, 5 Years

Schulter Public School Board Member Seat 1, 5 Years

Twin Hills Public School Board Member Seat 3, 3 Year

Wilson Public School Board Members Seat 1, 5 Years

Green Country Tech Center Seat 4, 5 Years

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